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Courses

A total of 36 credits are required.

In addition to the courses listed below, there are courses available through graduate certificate programs in various subject areas, including: professional communication, leadership, project management and human resources management.

Please contact the College of Interdisciplinary Studies for more information.

Required Online Courses

INDS500: Theory in Interdisciplinary Studies

Guides students in exploration of dominant theoretical paradigms currently used in applied social science studies. Draws from theories used in anthropology, communication studies, education, environmental studies, gender studies, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology. Places special emphasis on interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary theoretical frameworks and on theories guiding applied research.

Course Credits: 3.00

INDS505: Academic Writing and Critical Thinking Across Disciplines

Introduces communication strategies designed to enhance clear and effective written discourse at the graduate level across disciplines. Examines the basic principles of successful scholarly writing, including those specific to the students’ own disciplines, and the critical analysis of academic research and discourse. Students will write a critical literature review through a series of research and writing assignments in an interactive online environment.

Course Credits: 3.00

INDS510: Social Science Research Methods

Introduces students to qualitative and quantitative research methods commonly used in the social sciences. Emphasizes applied research projects designed from interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or transdisciplinary perspectives. Covers basic research process, research topics and questions, research design, accessing and evaluating research, common methodologies, data collection, ethics, and analysis interpretation and communication of research results.

Course Credits: 3.00

New Courses

INDS515: Global Perspectives on Indigenous Ways of Knowing

Critically introduces students to Indigenous ways of knowing within the contexts of colonialism and contemporary challenges. Explores Indigenous perspectives on identity, the environment, knowledge acquisition, and renewed political relationships. This graduate version of INDS 400 Global Perspectives on Indigenous Ways of Knowing requires students to demonstrate graduate-level skills in reading, writing, and critical analysis and to apply these skills in a research review paper.
Course Credits: 3.00

INDS525: LGBTQ2S+ Global Issues and Community Engagement

Introduces students to history and current issues affecting LGBTQ+ individuals and their communities with particular attention to seniors, youth, cultural and linguistic minority groups. Includes discussion of issues affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, agender, transgender, non-binary, queer and Two-Spirit individuals and communities. Examines ways of creating welcoming and inclusive organizations, public services, and communities and approaches LGBTQ2S+ issues from human rights and cultural identity perspectives.
Course Credits: 3.00

Major Project/Thesis Option

A period of 12 months is allocated to work on the Major Project or Thesis.
Students may choose one major project/thesis option:

INDS640: Major Project

The Major Project constitutes an independent, applied, interdisciplinary research project. The Major Project should demonstrate the student’s knowledge of theory and the ability to apply it in the field and is worth 12 credits. Projects can be carried out at the student’s place of work or with another organization or agency and may or may not involve human participants. In the MA Interdisciplinary Studies, the Major Project is the focal point of a student’s program of study, which has been designed to provide the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary theoretical and methodological foundations for the project. The optimum length for a major project is about 35 pages (about 9,000 words) and should constitute approximately 400 hours of effort by the student. To obtain a copy of the Major Project handbook please contact the program office rru-cis-admin@royalroads.ca.

Course Credits: 12.00

INDS690: Thesis

A thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem. The thesis demonstrates the ability of a student to analyze existing research, collate or collect data, and apply it in the context of an existing problem. The result is a de novo synthesis of theoretical and empirical information. The thesis identifies a problem, provides a rationale for the study, and states the hypothesis or research question. It identifies major theoretical assumptions, explains the methods chosen to study the problem, analyzes the data, and offers a conclusion or recommendation based on the data and theoretical framing. The finished thesis evidences originality, critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough documentation. The optimum length for a thesis is about 35-40 pages (about 9,000-10,000 words) and should constitute approximately 400 hours of effort by the learner.

Course Credits: 12.00

Residency Courses

Below is a list of residencies that include two or more courses in individual program areas. Students may choose one of the program area residencies below.

Master of Arts in Conflict Analysis and Management

CAMN503: Professional Skills: Dealing with Conflict

Links theory with professional practice. Develops professional skills for dealing with conflict in and among groups and teams in a safe learning environment. Analyzes the different characteristics of interpersonal, intra-group and intergroup conflicts and how this informs professional practice. Pre-requisite: CAMN502
Course Credits: 3.00
Pre Requisite(s): CAMN502: Foundation: Understanding Conflict, Change and Systems in Organizational Contexts

CAMN504: Reflective Practice: Leading Change in Organizational Settings

Focuses on reflective practice, professional conduct, and leadership skills for the conflict management practitioner. Applies a systems approach to conflict and change management. Develops competencies for tapping into the creative potential of conflict towards the goal of productive organizational change. Pre-requisite: CAMN502
Course Credits: 3.00
Pre Requisite(s): CAMN502: Foundation: Understanding Conflict, Change and Systems in Organizational Contexts

Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication

EECO500: Developing Environmental Understandings

Explores how personal environmental identities, values, beliefs, feelings and attitudes are formed. Considers how environmental education and communication programs approach building a sense of place and wonder; offer direct experience in the environment; help develop responsible environmental behaviours; and build the capacity to implement meaningful environmental actions that resolve environmental problems and issues. Students examine the historic evolution of environmental education and communications, and various theories of environmental learning and literacy. Co-requisite: EECO503
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO503: Foundations for Environmental Communication

Explores the intersection of communication and the environment in various mediated and unmediated forms. Introduces a range of significant interpersonal, group/organizational and mass communication theories to environmental communication. Examines those theories from the context of their practical contributions to environmental communications and our understanding of how we form notions about the environment. Highlights the essential role communication has played in getting us to our current environmental situation and the role communication might play in helping us to change course.
Course Credits: 3.00

Master of Arts in Environment and Management

ENVR505: Ecosystem Science and Management

Examines basic ecological principles and concepts as they apply to different scales of focus, from individual species to landscapes, and introduces basic tools of environmental management. Demonstrates how ecological principles and managerial tools can be applied to deal with commonly encountered challenges of ecosystem management.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR506: Analytical Thinking and Communications

Introduces analytical thinking and rational argument in the context of professional environmental practice. Teaches how to identify vague and ambiguous concepts, fallacies and other features of weak arguments in the work of others, and how to avoid those weaknesses and to build strong arguments oneself. Offers several tools to organize arguments within technical writing. These tools and skills can also apply to academic study and writing a thesis.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR530: Economics for Decision Making

Introduces theories, concepts and facts about competing economic paradigms, and develops skills needed to integrate economic and environmental decisions. Examines selected economic instruments from member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and reviews leading practices in the application of these instruments, considering their effectiveness, efficiency, and public acceptability.
Course Credits: 3.00

Master of Arts in Global Leadership

GBLD501: Personal and Theoretical Foundations to Global Leadership

Critically explores key concepts of global leadership through personal, collective, and theoretical lenses to prepare students for the MAGL program. This includes learning about one’s own cultural ‘lenses’, mental models and the historical structural inequalities, and coming to a broader understanding and integration of approaches to working in a global context. Participants will explore and describe their personal and collective values and goals, establish personal and collective learning plans, and prepare life and self for residency. During this course, a strong emphasis will be placed on building a supportive learning community, thus creating a strong foundation for the program.
Course Credits: 3.00

GBLD505: Personal Capacities for Working in Complex Global Systems

Focuses on building personal capacities in a global setting by developing self-awareness and self-management skills in regard to each individual’s values, beliefs, practices, and assumptions. Students will engage in developing intercultural communication skills that support authentic and collaborative relationships with others who have different values, beliefs, and behaviours. Students will explore and describe their own orientation to the world so as to enhance adaptability and resiliency in complex, changing environments. Students will learn the fundamentals of global leadership in complex environments. Students will learn to apply systems approaches to understanding complex organizational and societal systems, adopting different ways of knowing and considering political, social, cultural and spiritual perspectives. Students will explore dynamics of power across generational, gender and class divides and learn how to tap into the creative potentials of diversity, conflict, change and complexity. Pre-requisites: GBLD 501 or with permission.
Course Credits: 9.00

Master of Arts in Human Security and Peacebuilding

HSPB530: International Law and Global Institutions

Examines the foundations and mechanisms of international law as they apply to issues of human security and peacebuilding, with a specific focus on how the theory and practice of this law converge in the actual operations of the United Nations and other global institutions. It also focuses on the role of courts and their jurisdiction as they relate to conflict resolution, deterrence, enforcement, trans-nationality and trans-boundary issues, especially with reference to human rights, international crimes and threats to human security and peacebuilding, with relation to these institutions. The emphasis throughout the course is on the dynamic interaction of theory and practice between law and institutions. Pre-requisites: HSPB 500.
Course Credits: 3.00
Pre Requisite(s): HSPB500: Foundations of Human Security and Peacebuilding

HSPB600: Diplomacy, Development and Crisis Management

A skills-oriented course emphasizing methods and tools used in development planning and in crisis response, including the design and management of interventions (such as programs or campaigns), ethical considerations, conflict mapping, negotiation, and mediation. Explores the relationship between the theoretical and the practical aspects of field activities, and introduces students to relevant theory of political systems in the context of conflict, development theory, and has a strong emphasis on evidence-based planning and assessment. Pre-requisites: HSPB 500.
Course Credits: 3.00
Pre Requisite(s): HSPB500: Foundations of Human Security and Peacebuilding

Master of Arts in Intercultural and International Communication

IICS515: Intercultural Theory and Practice

Introduces contemporary and classic theories of intercultural communication. Provides an overview of the development of the fields of study and introduces students to leading theorists. Immerses students in discussion of applicability of theoretical frameworks in professional and personal settings.
Course Credits: 3.00

IICS551: Organizational Communication and Culture

Analyzes organizational structures and management styles with a focus on culture. Considers areas of organizational communication such as crisis management, corporate image, identity, and reputation, organizational culture and culture change, leadership theories, social relationships and networks, communication audits, power and control in organizational life, conflict in organizations, ethics and values, and corporate social responsibility. Conducted through interactive lectures, case studies, discussions, and applied activities such as role playing and team presentations.
Course Credits: 3.00

PCOM620: Research in Communication Studies

Provides students with an introduction to the foundations of communication research and to the concepts and procedures of qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Covers strategies for critically assessing published empirical research and discusses the role of epistemological and ontological assumptions in the application of paradigms of knowledge. Reviews issues concerning ethics in research and the function of social values in the process of knowledge construction. Examines research design and logic systems and reviews the process of crafting research proposals.
Course Credits: 3.00

Master of Arts in Leadership

LEAD526: Fundamentals of Personal Leadership and Learning

Examines the theory and practice of personal leadership including the pursuit of self understanding, self management of continuous learning, and professional responsibility and accountability. Develops students' abilities to incorporate action inquiry and continuous learning in the practice of leadership and the ability to model espoused principles and values. Provides opportunities to enhance personal strengths and address challenges. Fosters an appreciation of the interdependent and contextual nature of effective leadership. LEAD 526, LEAD 527, and LEAD 528 are corequisites.
Course Credits: 3.00

LEAD527: Communications and Leadership in Groups and Teams

Examines the theory and practice of leading productive teams and of facilitating groups. Fosters appreciation of students' abilities to communicate effectively in working relationships in support of productive collaboration. Develops students' expertise in promoting effective decision-making, optimizing the benefits of diversity, planning and implementing of team goals, and assessing of outcomes. Promotes awareness and application of ethical principles and concepts. Encourages a systemic perspective to ensure fluid communication with the immediate organizational environment and knowledge of influences of the environment on the team. LEAD 526, LEAD 527, and LEAD 528 are corequisites.
Course Credits: 3.00

LEAD528: Leadership in Systems

Develops an appreciation for organizations and communities as open and interconnected systems by focusing on the interdependencies of contexts, structures, and relationships on their limits and possibilities. Combines systems thinking theory and concepts with leadership experience in the cohort, as a learning community and in an organization, to develop practical knowledge and skill in creating learning and work environments that generate engagement, productivity, and continuous improvement. LEAD 526, LEAD 527, and LEAD 528 are corequisites.
Course Credits: 3.00

Master of Arts in Professional Communication

PCOM510: Introduction to Communication Theory

Introduces major perspectives in communication theory. Includes the fundamentals of human communication and a critical examination of the effect of technology on communication.
Course Credits: 3.00

PCOM550: Communication and Culture in Organizations

Analyzes organizational structures, styles, and systems as they pertain to communication in organizations. Examines how strategic design and implementation of communication systems interact with human and technological factors to impact organizational culture. Considers issues related to emerging technologies, intellectual contributions, and organizational behaviour. Course conducted through case studies, research, and discussions and facilitated by leading organizational communication practitioners.
Course Credits: 3.00

PCOM620: Research in Communication Studies

Provides students with an introduction to the foundations of communication research and to the concepts and procedures of qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Covers strategies for critically assessing published empirical research and discusses the role of epistemological and ontological assumptions in the application of paradigms of knowledge. Reviews issues concerning ethics in research and the function of social values in the process of knowledge construction. Examines research design and logic systems and reviews the process of crafting research proposals.
Course Credits: 3.00

Master of Arts in Tourism Management

TRMN502: Global Tourism

The main objectives of this course are understanding how global trends affect tourism and the strategic leadership approaches required for both tourism destinations and companies to develop and maintain a competitive advantage. Approaches used in leading an industry with a global reach, along with local and national issues, will also be examined. Leadership styles and cross-cultural competencies required to create a culture of innovation in tourism are reviewed as a key feature of global tourism partnerships. Examples of international tourism leaders and leadership of tourism organizations will be used to illustrate best practices within the industry.
Course Credits: 3.00

Online Courses

CAMN502: Foundation: Understanding Conflict, Change and Systems in Organizational Contexts

Provides a holistic and interdisciplinary approach to understanding conflict analysis and management as a field of study and practice. Focuses on engaging with conflict, change, and systems specifically related to organizational contexts
Course Credits: 3.00

CAMN552: Structures: Legal Frameworks and Conflict Engagement

Provides an introduction to legal systems and quasi-legal processes used in conflict resolution, including courts, arbitration and restorative justice. Advances skills of legal analysis, case analysis and problem-solving. Critically examines the role of law in shaping relationships between individuals and groups as well as between the state and society.
Course Credits: 3.00

CAMN553: Processes: Designing Conflict Management Practice

Examines conflict-management process design in organizational contexts, including impact assessment. Advances interpersonal communication and intercultural competencies. Explores the use of technology as a process tool. Pre-requisite: CAMN502
Course Credits: 3.00

CHMN635: Leading Strategic Systems and Culture Change

Explore ways to create a comprehensive change strategy that engages all levels of an organization. Focuses on the multi-dimensional approaches required to inspire and execute positive change, including managing power and influence; facilitating engagement and communication strategies; and building sustainable change-leadership capacity.
Course Credits: 3.00

CHMN675: Organizational Change: Advanced Models, Methodologies and Measurement

Explores tools for facilitating planned changes and personal transitions. Viewing organizations and communities as systems, the course examines the key levers for change and how to integrate these into the change planning process. Using this systems view as a foundational platform, several contemporary models of change will be presented including appreciative inquiry, whole systems change and project management. Students will apply knowledge using case studies, examining why change efforts fail and, more importantly, what roles leaders play in ensuring the successful implementation of change initiatives.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM530: Planning for School Improvement

Focuses on the development of effective and practical school plans using a results-based lens. Explores various models and frameworks for developing school improvement plans. Examines the role of evidence-based decision making and the use of data-driven strategies in support of developing, implementing, and reviewing school plans. Investigates how to make school improvement planning an inclusive and collaborative process.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM540: Building and Managing the School Community

Examines the interpersonal dynamics of the learning environment with a focus on identifying the shared and disputed norms in the learning community as well as a diversity of needs and interests of students and stakeholders. Applies systems and change theories to managing complexity and resolving conflict as well as working inclusively to promote growth and improvement. Examines issues of governance and the role of law in educational administration.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM550: Communication for Learning

Examines current practices for communicating information about student learning both within the school community and to the community at large and considers the potential impacts of changing these practices. Develops interpersonal communication strategies to interact effectively with individuals or in group and team settings. Explores the role of communication in building a supportive community including parents, community members and senior administrators.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM560: Leading in the Technology-Mediated Environment

Introduces the range of student service options required in technology-mediated learning environments and the challenges involved in their provision. Considers the needs of students, and the role of staff and faculty professional development programs in supporting students. Examines the impact of introducing e-learning into a traditional institution as well as the role of electronic learning networks in supporting school improvement.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM570: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

Introduces the concept of assessment as, for, and of learning with an emphasis on aligning curriculum with assessment. Distinguishes between large-scale assessment and assessment for learning. Explores the cultural constructs impacting curriculum and assessment. Examines current thinking about authentic assessment and assessment strategies, as well as the challenges inherent in interpreting and communicating evaluation evidence.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM580: Supervision for Learning

Addresses the topic of supervision of instructional practices from the perspective of performance-based assessment. Distinguishes between performance-based supervision and evaluation. Considers the impact of supervision on the learning community.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO503: Foundations for Environmental Communication

Explores the intersection of communication and the environment in various mediated and unmediated forms. Introduces a range of significant interpersonal, group/organizational and mass communication theories to environmental communication. Examines those theories from the context of their practical contributions to environmental communications and our understanding of how we form notions about the environment. Highlights the essential role communication has played in getting us to our current environmental situation and the role communication might play in helping us to change course.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO504: Systems Perspectives

Explores the value and implications of engaging in systems thinking for environmental education and communication. Investigates what systems thinking means, and what systems thinking entails through reviewing, engaging with, and applying key concepts and common approaches that are used in systems work. Considers the source and nature of various perspectives on systems, and reveals how different approaches lead to different understanding and thus different action. Distinguishes the opportunities and constraints of acting responsibly in a complex systems world.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO508: Learning Theory and Program Design

Cultivates increasingly sophisticated understanding of learning processes. The search for meaning through the active elaboration of our meaning system - one possible definition of learning - seems to be at the core of being human. As a result of this course, educators will be better able to design effective programs and products. Instructional design will be seen as an intentional process to create learning environments that support effective and efficient learning and instruction appropriate to particular bodies of skill and content and in specific contexts. With support and critique from classmates, students will design or re-design an instructional module they use or plan to use in their environmental education work.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO510: Worldviews, Ethics, and the Environment

Examines the range of philosophical and ethical stances at work today as expressed in contemporary environmental education and communications. Investigates environmental ethics as they are tested against real-world environmental problems.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO586: The Biosphere and Sustainability

Explores the ecological principles governing the dynamic structures and processes of ecosystems and sustainability and how they can be applied to better understand responses to anthropogenic stress.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVP500: Developing a Sustainability Perspective

Explores the applicability of environmental sustainability concepts and principles in developing a sustainable society. Highlights the tensions that exist between our various value systems and how underlying root metaphors influence attitudes towards the environment. Investigates how environmental sustainability concepts and principles inform the development of a sustainable society from the perspectives of community, business, governance, and leadership as well as how they influence the measurement of performance and outcomes will establish the overall philosophical orientation of the program, and helps each student better define for him or herself what sustainable development means, and why it is such an important concept today.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR505: Ecosystem Science and Management

Examines basic ecological principles and concepts as they apply to different scales of focus, from individual species to landscapes, and introduces basic tools of environmental management. Demonstrates how ecological principles and managerial tools can be applied to deal with commonly encountered challenges of ecosystem management.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR514: Global Environmental Processes and Current Issues

Introduces the latest scientific research of our changing natural earth "system" to create the basis for thinking about and understanding the complex issues created by global climate change and global biodiversity. Addresses challenges with respect to biodiversity, climate change, adaptations and governance from both international and Canadian perspectives. Provides an opportunity to learn and practice debating and scientific conference presentation skills.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR530: Economics for Decision Making

Introduces theories, concepts and facts about competing economic paradigms, and develops skills needed to integrate economic and environmental decisions. Examines selected economic instruments from member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and reviews leading practices in the application of these instruments, considering their effectiveness, efficiency, and public acceptability.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR545: Sustainable Development: From Theory to Practice

Takes students beyond theory to the difficulty