Courses

A total of 36 credit hours are required.

In addition to the courses listed below, there are also courses available through various Graduate Certificates in subject areas including: Professional Communication, Leadership, Project Management and Human Resources Management. Please contact the program office for more information.

Required Online Courses

INDS500: Theory in Interdisciplinary Studies

Guides students in exploration of dominant theoretical paradigms currently used in applied social science studies. Draws from theories used in anthropology, communication studies, education, environmental studies, gender studies, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology. Places special emphasis on interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary theoretical frameworks and on theories guiding applied research.

Course Credits: 3.00

INDS510: Social Science Research Methods

Introduces students to qualitative and quantitative research methods commonly used in the social sciences. Emphasizes applied research projects designed from interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or transdisciplinary perspectives. Covers basic research process, research topics and questions, research design, accessing and evaluating research, common methodologies, data collection, ethics, and analysis interpretation and communication of research results.

Course Credits: 3.00

Major Project/Thesis Option

A period of 12 months is allocated to work on the Major Project or Thesis.
Students may choose one major project/thesis option:

INDS640: Major Project

The Major Project constitutes an independent, applied, interdisciplinary research project. The Major Project should demonstrate the student’s knowledge of theory and the ability to apply it in the field and is worth 12 credits. Projects can be carried out at the student’s place of work or with another organization or agency and may or may not involve human participants. In the MA Interdisciplinary Studies, the Major Project is the focal point of a student’s program of study, which has been designed to provide the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary theoretical and methodological foundations for the project. The optimum length for a major project is about 35 pages (about 9,000 words) and should constitute approximately 400 hours of effort by the student. To obtain a copy of the Major Project handbook please contact the program office rru-fsas-ois-admin@royalroads.ca.

Course Credits: 12.00

INDS690: Thesis

A thesis is a written product of a systematic study of a significant problem. The thesis demonstrates the ability of a student to analyze existing research, collate or collect data, and apply it in the context of an existing problem. The result is a de novo synthesis of theoretical and empirical information. The thesis identifies a problem, provides a rationale for the study, and states the hypothesis or research question. It identifies major theoretical assumptions, explains the methods chosen to study the problem, analyzes the data, and offers a conclusion or recommendation based on the data and theoretical framing. The finished thesis evidences originality, critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough documentation. The optimum length for a thesis is about 35-40 pages (about 9,000-10,000 words) and should constitute approximately 400 hours of effort by the learner.

Course Credits: 12.00

Residency Courses

Below is a list of residencies that include two or more courses in individual program areas. Students may choose one of the program area residencies below.

Master of Arts in Conflict Analysis and Management

CAMN503: Professional Skills: Dealing with Conflict

Links theory with professional practice. Develops professional skills for dealing with conflict in and among groups and teams in a safe learning environment. Analyzes the different characteristics of interpersonal, intra-group and intergroup conflicts and how this informs professional practice. Pre-requisite: CAMN502
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):
CAMN502: Foundation: Understanding Conflict, Change and Systems in Organizational Contexts

CAMN504: Reflective Practice: Leading Change in Organizational Settings

Focuses on reflective practice, professional conduct, and leadership skills for the conflict management practitioner. Applies a systems approach to conflict and change management. Develops competencies for tapping into the creative potential of conflict towards the goal of productive organizational change. Pre-requisite: CAMN502
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):
CAMN502: Foundation: Understanding Conflict, Change and Systems in Organizational Contexts

Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication

EECO500: Developing Environmental Understandings

Explores how personal environmental identities, values, beliefs, feelings and attitudes are formed. . Considers how environmental education and communication programs approach building a sense of place and wonder; offer direct experience in the environment; help develop responsible environmental behaviours; and build the capacity to implement meaningful environmental actions that resolve environmental problems and issues. Students examine the historic evolution of environmental education and communications, and various theories of environmental learning and literacy
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

EECO503: Foundations for Environmental Communication

Explores the intersection of communication and the environment in various mediated and unmediated forms. Introduces a range of significant interpersonal, group/organizational and mass communication theories to environmental communication. Examines those theories from the context of their practical contributions to environmental communications and our understanding of how we form notions about the environment. Highlights the essential role communication has played in getting us to our current environmental situation and the role communication might play in helping us to change course.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

Master of Arts in Environment and Management

ENVR505: Ecosystem Science and Management

Examines basic ecological principles and concepts as they apply to different scales of focus, from individual species to landscapes, and introduces basic tools of environmental management. Demonstrates how ecological principles and managerial tools can be applied to deal with commonly encountered challenges of ecosystem management.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

ENVR506: Analytical Thinking and Communications

Introduces analytical thinking and rational argument in the context of professional environmental practice. Teaches how to identify vague and ambiguous concepts, fallacies and other features of weak arguments in the work of others, and how to avoid those weaknesses and to build strong arguments oneself. Offers several tools to organize arguments within technical writing. These tools and skills can also apply to academic study and writing a thesis.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

ENVR530: Economics for Decision Making

Introduces theories, concepts and facts about competing economic paradigms, and develops skills needed to integrate economic and environmental decisions. Examines selected economic instruments from member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and reviews leading practices in the application of these instruments, considering their effectiveness, efficiency, and public acceptability.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

Master of Arts in Global Leadership

GBLD501: Personal and Theoretical Foundations to Global Leadership

Critically explores key concepts of global leadership through personal, collective, and theoretical lenses to prepare students for the MAGL program. This includes learning about one’s own cultural ‘lenses’, mental models and the historical structural inequalities, and coming to a broader understanding and integration of approaches to working in a global context. Participants will explore and describe their personal and collective values and goals, establish personal and collective learning plans, and prepare life and self for residency. During this course, a strong emphasis will be placed on building a supportive learning community, thus creating a strong foundation for the program.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

GBLD505: Personal Capacities for Working in Complex Global Systems

Focuses on building personal capacities in a global setting by developing self-awareness and self-management skills in regard to each individual’s values, beliefs, practices, and assumptions. Students will engage in building understanding and communication skills that support authentic and collaborative relationships with others who have different values, beliefs, and behaviours. Students will explore and describe their own orientation to the world and how they exist with and relate to others from diverse cultural backgrounds. This includes being adaptive and resilient in complex, changing environments. Students will engage in systems thinking as they examine and apply concepts from complexity science to adaptive systems where cause and effect co-evolve over time. Students will learn the fundamentals of leadership in complex environments, the ability to nurture emergence and tap into wisdom and power in the face of uncertainty. Students will explore the relevance of generational, gendered, and cultural difference (among other dimensions of difference including social structures), and how these influence leadership styles when facilitating change and innovation in complex environments. Pre-requisites: GBLD 501 or with permission
Course Credits: 9.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

Master of Arts in Human Security and Peacebuilding

HSPB530: International Law and Global Institutions

Examines the foundations and mechanisms of international law as they apply to issues of human security and peacebuilding, with a specific focus on how the theory and practice of this law converge in the actual operations of the United Nations and other global institutions. It also focuses on the role of courts and their jurisdiction as they relate to conflict resolution, deterrence, enforcement, trans-nationality and trans-boundary issues, especially with reference to human rights, international crimes and threats to human security and peacebuilding, with relation to these institutions. The emphasis throughout the course is on the dynamic interaction of theory and practice between law and institutions. Pre-requisites: HSPB 500.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):
HSPB500: Foundations of Human Security and Peacebuilding

HSPB600: Diplomacy, Development and Crisis Management

A skills-oriented course emphasizing methods and tools used in development planning and in crisis response, including the design and management of interventions (such as programs or campaigns), ethical considerations, conflict mapping, negotiation, and mediation. Explores the relationship between the theoretical and the practical aspects of field activities, and introduces students to relevant theory of political systems in the context of conflict, development theory, and has a strong emphasis on evidence-based planning and assessment. Pre-requisites: HSPB 500.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):
HSPB500: Foundations of Human Security and Peacebuilding

Master of Arts in Intercultural and International Communication

IICS515: Intercultural and International Communication Theory

Introduces contemporary and classic theories of intercultural communication, international communication, cross-cultural communication and development communication. Provides an overview of the development of these fields of study and introduces students to leading theorists. Immerses students in discussion of applicability of theoretical frameworks in professional and personal settings.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

IICS551: Organizational Communication and Culture

Analyzes organizational structures and management styles with a focus on culture. Considers areas of organizational communication such as crisis management, corporate image, identity, and reputation, organizational culture and culture change, leadership theories, social relationships and networks, communication audits, power and control in organizational life, conflict in organizations, ethics and values, and corporate social responsibility. Conducted through interactive lectures, case studies, discussions, and applied activities such as role playing and team presentations.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

IICS635: Communication for Development and Social Change

Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

Master of Arts in Professional Communication

PCOM510: Introduction to Communication Theory

Introduces major perspectives in communication theory. Includes the fundamentals of human communication and a critical examination of the effect of technology on communication.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

PCOM550: Organizational Communication

Analyzes organizational structures, styles, and systems as they pertain to communication in organizations. Examines how strategic design and implementation of communication systems interact with human and technological factors to impact organizational culture. Considers issues related to emerging technologies, intellectual contributions, and organizational behaviour. Course conducted through case studies, research, and discussions and facilitated by leading organizational communication practitioners.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

PCOM620: Research in Communication Studies

Provides students with an introduction to the foundations of communication research and to the concepts and procedures of qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Covers strategies for critically assessing published empirical research and discusses the role of epistemological and ontological assumptions in the application of paradigms of knowledge. Reviews issues concerning ethics in research and the function of social values in the process of knowledge construction. Examines research design and logic systems and reviews the process of crafting research proposals.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

Master of Arts in Tourism Management

TRMN502: Global Tourism

The main objectives of this course are understanding how global trends affect tourism and the strategic leadership approaches required for both tourism destinations and companies to develop and maintain a competitive advantage. Approaches used in leading an industry with a global reach, along with local and national issues, will also be examined. Leadership styles and cross-cultural competencies required to create a culture of innovation in tourism are reviewed as a key feature of global tourism partnerships. Examples of international tourism leaders and leadership of tourism organizations will be used to illustrate best practices within the industry.
Course Credits: 3.00
Co Requisite(s):
Pre Requisite(s):

Online Courses

CAMN502: Foundation: Understanding Conflict, Change and Systems in Organizational Contexts

Provides a holistic and interdisciplinary approach to understanding conflict analysis and management as a field of study and practice. Focuses on engaging with conflict, change, and systems specifically related to organizational contexts
Course Credits: 3.00

CAMN552: Structures: Legal Frameworks and Conflict Engagement

Provides an introduction to legal systems and quasi-legal processes used in conflict resolution, including courts, arbitration and restorative justice. Advances skills of legal analysis, case analysis and problem-solving. Critically examines the role of law in shaping relationships between individuals and groups as well as between the state and society.
Course Credits: 3.00

CAMN553: Processes: Designing Conflict Management Practice

Examines conflict-management process design in organizational contexts, including impact assessment. Advances interpersonal communication and intercultural competencies. Explores the use of technology as a process tool. Pre-requisite: CAMN502
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM530: Planning for School Improvement

Focuses on the development of effective and practical school plans using a results-based lens. Explores various models and frameworks for developing school improvement plans. Examines the role of evidence-based decision making and the use of data-driven strategies in support of developing, implementing, and reviewing school plans. Investigates how to make school improvement planning an inclusive and collaborative process.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM540: Building and Managing the School Community

Examines the interpersonal dynamics of the learning environment with a focus on identifying the shared and disputed norms in the learning community as well as a diversity of needs and interests of students and stakeholders. Applies systems and change theories to managing complexity and resolving conflict as well as working inclusively to promote growth and improvement. Examines issues of governance and the role of law in educational administration.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM550: Communication for Learning

Examines current practices for communicating information about student learning both within the school community and to the community at large and considers the potential impacts of changing these practices. Develops interpersonal communication strategies to interact effectively with individuals or in group and team settings. Explores the role of communication in building a supportive community including parents, community members and senior administrators.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM560: Leading in the Technology-Mediated Environment

Introduces the range of student service options required in technology-mediated learning environments and the challenges involved in their provision. Considers the needs of students, and the role of staff and faculty professional development programs in supporting students. Examines the impact of introducing e-learning into a traditional institution as well as the role of electronic learning networks in supporting school improvement.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM570: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

Introduces the concept of assessment as, for, and of learning with an emphasis on aligning curriculum with assessment. Distinguishes between large-scale assessment and assessment for learning. Explores the cultural constructs impacting curriculum and assessment. Examines current thinking about authentic assessment and assessment strategies, as well as the challenges inherent in interpreting and communicating evaluation evidence.
Course Credits: 3.00

EDLM580: Supervision for Learning

Addresses the topic of supervision of instructional practices from the perspective of performance-based assessment. Distinguishes between performance-based supervision and evaluation. Considers the impact of supervision on the learning community.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO503: Foundations for Environmental Communication

Explores the intersection of communication and the environment in various mediated and unmediated forms. Introduces a range of significant interpersonal, group/organizational and mass communication theories to environmental communication. Examines those theories from the context of their practical contributions to environmental communications and our understanding of how we form notions about the environment. Highlights the essential role communication has played in getting us to our current environmental situation and the role communication might play in helping us to change course.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO504: Systems Perspectives

Explores the value and implications of engaging in systems thinking for environmental education and communication. Investigates what systems thinking means, and what systems thinking entails through reviewing, engaging with, and applying key concepts and common approaches that are used in systems work. Considers the source and nature of various perspectives on systems, and reveals how different approaches lead to different understanding and thus different action. Distinguishes the opportunities and constraints of acting responsibly in a complex systems world.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO508: Learning Theory and Program Design

Cultivates increasingly sophisticated understanding of learning processes. The search for meaning through the active elaboration of our meaning system - one possible definition of learning - seems to be at the core of being human. As a result of this course, educators will be better able to design effective programs and products. Instructional design will be seen as an intentional process to create learning environments that support effective and efficient learning and instruction appropriate to particular bodies of skill and content and in specific contexts. With support and critique from classmates, students will design or re-design an instructional module they use or plan to use in their environmental education work.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO510: Worldviews, Ethics, and the Environment

Examines the concept of worldviews and how worldviews intersect with a range of philosophical and ethical stances at work today as expressed in contemporary environmental education and communications. A significant part of the course involves personal reflection on one’s own worldview and ethical foundations. Investigates environmental ethics as they are tested against real-world environmental problems.
Course Credits: 3.00

EECO586: The Biosphere and Sustainability

Explores the ecological principles governing the dynamic structures and processes of ecosystems and sustainability and how they can be applied to better understand responses to anthropogenic stress.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVP500: Developing a Sustainability Perspective

Explores the applicability of environmental sustainability concepts and principles in developing a sustainable society. Highlights the tensions that exist between our various value systems and how underlying root metaphors influence attitudes towards the environment. Investigates how environmental sustainability concepts and principles inform the development of a sustainable society from the perspectives of community, business, governance, and leadership as well as how they influence the measurement of performance and outcomes will establish the overall philosophical orientation of the program, and helps each student better define for him or herself what sustainable development means, and why it is such an important concept today.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR505: Ecosystem Science and Management

Examines basic ecological principles and concepts as they apply to different scales of focus, from individual species to landscapes, and introduces basic tools of environmental management. Demonstrates how ecological principles and managerial tools can be applied to deal with commonly encountered challenges of ecosystem management.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR514: Global Environmental Processes and Current Issues

Introduces the latest scientific research of our changing natural earth "system" to create the basis for thinking about and understanding the complex issues created by global climate change and global biodiversity. Addresses challenges with respect to biodiversity, climate change, adaptations and governance from both international and Canadian perspectives. Provides an opportunity to learn and practice debating and scientific conference presentation skills.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR530: Economics for Decision Making

Introduces theories, concepts and facts about competing economic paradigms, and develops skills needed to integrate economic and environmental decisions. Examines selected economic instruments from member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and reviews leading practices in the application of these instruments, considering their effectiveness, efficiency, and public acceptability.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR545: Sustainable Development: From Theory to Practice

Takes students beyond theory to the difficulty of the practice of sustainable development. Introduces the topic historically, and addresses the current debates over the meaning of sustainable development. Explains the longstanding discussions concerning economic growth and common resource allocation and introduces the difficult task of measuring human impact. Applies theoretical concerns to the issue of climate change in Canada, with particular focus on how we generate and consume energy. Gives students the opportunity to reflect on their own lives, and on the practices of sustainable development in their own communities.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR560: Environmental Accounting and Reporting

Examines environmental accounting and reporting methods to improve business decisions and performance, including: identifying internal environmental costs (both direct and indirect), identifying external environmental costs (especially those costs which the firm may be accountable for in the future), applying activity based costing (total cost assessment, life cycle assessment, and full cost accounting to business operations), developing environmental performance measures and indicators, and reporting on environmental performance.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR571: Legal Aspects of Environmental Management

Provides an overview of current environmental law and policy, including the role of the common law, legislation, regulation and policy and how it evolves over time. Explains how the constitutional division of powers is relevant to environmental management in Canada and examines the role of federal, provincial and local governments, and First Nations in regulating environmental protection. Examines the development and implementation of international environmental legal instruments and explores the use of environmental assessment as a tool to prevent unwanted impacts.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR582: Environmental Analysis and Remediation

Focuses on assessment and remediation of contaminants. Addresses anthropogenic activities which may introduce physical and chemical contaminants into the surrounding air, water or land. Discusses principles of environmental sampling and the application of physical and chemical analytical methodologies to assess the concentration of contaminants in soil, water and sediments. Examines quality assurance and quality control practices as well as strategies for the management of environmental contaminants including pollution prevention and remediation. Explores remedial approaches including physical, chemical, thermal and biological technologies.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR626: Leadership and Sustainable Development

Synthesizes the cumulative learning of the three residencies by developing personal leadership and action plans within the context of a dramatically changing world order. Students explore the relationships between social capital and natural capital and build a comprehensive understanding of both the personal and social dimensions of sustainability.
Course Credits: 3.00

ENVR660: Environmental Management Tools

Provides a critical overview and framework for working with environmental and sustainability management systems and tools. Examines various systems of environmental management and tools such as Environmental Impact Assessment and related processes, Environmental Performance Evaluation, and Sustainability Assessment and Risk Assessment. Emphasis will be on the “how-to,” and students are expected to familiarize themselves with the appropriate techniques and methods.
Course Credits: 3.00

EXMN652: Building Sustainable Communities

Explores leadership in relation to building sustainable communities. Applies a broad brush to the topic, fostering a systems view of the challenges inherent in the course title. Grapples with the principles and practice of Community Development and Sustainability. Explores the values and paradoxes of individual and formal leadership in building communities that thrive in balance with their members, the broader community and the environment. Provides challenging opportunities to build learning and capability in specific areas of interest and relevance to the student.
Course Credits: 3.00

EXMN662: Leading Innovation

Prepares students to lead innovative teams by fostering awareness of their own and others’ default tendencies, as innovators, and by fostering the adoption of systemic creative problem-solving approaches. The course draws on Creative Problem Solving and Design Thinking models to provide students with a three-stage process for leading innovation that blends theory and practice. Students will better understand processes of innovation and will apply these processes to complex problems. Final portion of class is dedicated to a practicum exercise, which students can choose to do in their own workplace, in which students facilitate a Creative Problem Solving session.
Course Credits: 3.00

EXMN675: Coaching for Performance

Examines the philosophies and approaches to coaching in the workplace. The course will deal with developing a coaching philosophy and skill set so that learners can support high performance cultures in organizations. Learners will develop an awareness of the nature, purpose and process of coaching in the business environment and of the value of coaching for improving personal commitment and professional productivity.
Course Credits: 3.00

GBLD510: Social Structures and Dynamics within Social-Purpose Organizations

Examines the various structural models of social-purpose organizations, based on assumptions about purpose, power and authority, social justice, complexity, and leadership. Explores the role of organizational culture in social-purpose organizations as it influences employee expectations, horizontal structures, and rewards that go beyond monetary reimbursement. Social-purpose organizations seek to align values and expectations among managers, board, and donors while being sensitive to community expectations, all within an environment that values transparency and respect.
Course Credits: 3.00

GBLD511: Strategic Analysis, Decision Making and Evaluation

Develops knowledge and key skills necessary for conducting strategic analysis, decision making, and evaluation in the context of a ‘learning organization’ that is engaged in planning for complex social change. With donors and communities expecting results, and social-purpose organizations often working with uncertain long-term funding, competent planning is critical. The course will address how to establish innovative goals and processes, and project an ethical and accurate image of the organization, yet manage expectations that align with limited resources. Participants will be introduced to the processes of performance monitoring and evaluation, enabling them to assess the impact of organizational decision making and operations, and to revise decision making accordingly. Pre-requisites: GBLD501, GBLD505
Course Credits: 3.00

GBLD520: Navigating Geo-Political Dynamics of Global Communities

Develops understanding of global communities in their relationships to wider social, cultural, historical, political and economic settings, factors, and ideas. Students connect theories and practices in global community development to the shifting social, political, and economic environments that shape people’s lives in the global North and South. Participants explore the centrality of the concept of globalization and the integration of local and global forces. They develop and apply global literacy in a number of domains: political, economic, cultural, moral, organizational, and spiritual/religious. Pre-requisites: GBLD501 and GBLD505.
Course Credits: 3.00

GBLD521: Community Development Models

Examines a spectrum of community-development models, ranging from structured external models (e.g., the World Bank’s Community-Driven Development) to grassroots initiatives originating from within a community (e.g., community movements). Students critically analyze the applicability of various models to specific contexts in different geographic locations. Students develop the capacity to distinguish between power-based community development and program-based community development approaches, in addition to others. They will be able to explain how different community development approaches can work in a complementary fashion to optimize results at the community level. Pre-requisites GBLD 501 and GBLD 505
Course Credits: 3.00

GBLD522: Managing Difficult Relationships Within and Across Community Dynamics

Examines tensions and conflicts that arise from the multidimensional and intersectional nature of globalized communities. Using a range of examples from different geographic locations, analyzes how political, economic, cultural, moral, organizational and/or spiritual/religious goals can compete with one another. Participants learn to understand contemporary tensions in their historic contexts and how conflicts can be transformed constructively. Through analyses of selected models and strategies applied at the community level, students develop an understanding of community-based approaches to harness tensions and conflicts, and how to engage in relationships with a global leadership perspective. Pre-requisites: GBLD 501 and GBLD 505
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL520: Global and National Perspectives on Higher Education

Examines the roles that higher education plays in contributing to society from both Canadian and international perspectives. Considers how international, national and provincial policies shape and define higher education systems. Takes a critical stance on higher educational institutions’ design and organization. Considers issues of governance and institutional culture in various higher educational contexts.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL525: Global Perspectives on International Education

Explores historical and current conceptualizations of international education, including its roles and purposes. Examines key issues and critical perspectives that affect how higher education institutions integrate international education into their academic and business models. Considers distinctions in key concepts such as internationalism, internationalization, intercultural competence, and globalization and their implications for higher educational leadership. Analyzes key issues, opportunities, tensions, and conflicts associated with developing international programs and institutional models of internationalization.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL530: Leading Educational Change in Higher Education Environments

Examines the leader’s role in initiating, supporting, and sustaining innovation and change in higher education environments. Explores leadership and change-oriented models and theories that can be applied to higher education contexts. Considers the important role of organizational culture and how it affects both leadership approaches and organizational change models. Articulates how communication, collaboration and collegiality influence the change process. Engages participants in how to work effectively with disparate stakeholders (students, faculty, staff, government, interest groups, etc.) to promote positive organizational change.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL535: Communication and Organizational Culture in a Globalized World

Explores the role of communication processes and organizational culture in advancing international education in higher education. Examines the implications of communication competence for leaders relative to decision making, problem solving and conflict management in organizational settings. Introduces frameworks, models and concepts for developing communication plans, analyzing cultural contexts and leading cultural change in organizations.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL540: New Models for Institutional Viability

Examines how the finance, marketing, labour relations, and recruitment functions of higher education institutions need to work together to support enrolment growth and institutional development. Considers the implications and opportunities for developing effective collective bargaining processes. Explores the innovative ways that higher education institutions raise funds, market programs, and develop recruiting strategies to support programs and services.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL545: The Business of International Education

Examines key facets of the business side of international education, including business development, marketing and recruitment strategies, contract management, policy analysis and risk management. Explores the implication of cross-cultural contexts on marketing, strategic partnerships and business development. Considers the implications of international trade in educational services, including the impact of legal, political and fiscal requirements in foreign markets on business development opportunities. Examines the practical applications of global systems thinking to key institutional ventures such as offshore campuses, twinning arrangements and international collaborations.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL550: Systems Thinking and Strategic Planning in Higher Education

Focuses on the development of effective and practical plans using a results-based and systems-thinking focus. Explores various models and frameworks for developing both strategic and operational plans. Introduces systems thinking models, concepts and tools for examining complex and inter-dependent issues of significant importance to the post-secondary educational leader. Explores the philosophical and historical antecedents that inform current systems thinking models as well as current approaches to educational planning and development. Examines the role of evidence-based decision making and the use of data-driven strategies in support of developing, implementing, and reviewing plans. Investigates institutional management and planning as an inclusive and collaborative process.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL560: Quality, Accountability and Educational Effectiveness

Introduces the concept of public accountability and what it means in a post-secondary context. Explores the roles played by quality assurance and accountability systems in supporting organizational effectiveness. Looks at current models of quality assurance. Examines tensions between the concepts of improvement and accountability and considers the interests and perspectives of different internal and external stakeholders towards assuring educational quality.
Course Credits: 3.00

HEAL570: Leveraging Technology in Higher Education Environments

Introduces the range of models for integrating technology into the higher education learning environment. Examines the impact of introducing online learning into a traditional institution as well as the role of social media in supporting student learning. Explores student service options required in technology-mediated learning environments and the challenges involved in their provision. Considers the needs of students, and the role of staff and faculty professional development programs in supporting students.
Course Credits: 3.00

HSPB500: Foundations of Human Security and Peacebuilding

Focuses on the intellectual foundations of the field through an interdisciplinary examination of the challenges of human security. Approaches the study of human security from the perspectives of economic security, food security, health security, environmental security, personal security, community security, and political security. Employs broad concept of peacebuilding to designate social transformation that offers greater hope of long-term, sustainable peace. Seeks to illuminate basic theories and concepts through regular reference to concrete cases.
Course Credits: 3.00

HSPB515: Social Policy Issues: Social and Economic Insecurity

Examines linkages between economic restructuring, economic crises, globalization and social crises in the contemporary world. Explores the interconnectedness between local and global dimensions of recurring crises and the ways these relate to policy decisions and outcomes. Focuses on social policy issues as they relate to human security and social reconstruction, and strategies for translating peacebuilding into public policy in support of the foundations of civil society and the rule of law. Includes social reconstruction, humanitarianism in human security, and the social/economic context of conflict. Pre-requisites: HSPB 500.
Course Credits: 3.00

HSPB540: Conflict in the Post-Cold War Era

Uses systematic, substantive, analytical and historical approaches to examine the changing nature of conflict and security threats in the post-Cold War era. Includes a critical examination of the changing patterns of conflict, conflict generating issues, sub-national conflicts, terrorism, international intervention, and counterinsurgency. Examines the consequences of conflict such as refugees and economic decline and political impacts such as failed states. Analyzes the types of conflict resolution strategies and possible interventions and the extent to which conflict can be prevented or deterred. Pre-requisites: HSPB 500.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS611: Intercultural Competence

Examines core concepts and theories on culture and cultural competence. Engages students in application of theoretical frameworks in professional and personal settings. Provides students with an opportunity to critically examine their own socio-cultural locations to raise intercultural awareness, assist in intercultural mindset development, and facilitate intercultural competence development. Enables students to apply an intercultural analysis to complex situations involving stakeholders of different cultural backgrounds. Pre-requisites: One of DEMN502, CAMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS641: Foundations of Policy and Practice in Humanitarian Action

Analyzes the moral, ethical and legal basis for humanitarian action. Examines the history of humanitarian policy and practice, and considers its future trajectory in domestic and international contexts. Analyzes humanitarian actors and associated funding, coordination and accountability mechanisms and their influence on humanitarian practice. Examines principles of humanitarian action and efforts to professionalize humanitarian practice. Investigates the fundamentals of effective humanitarian action, including the modalities and the inter-relationship of assistance and protection. Pre-requisites: One of DEMN502, CAMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS642: Psychosocial Interventions: Managing Stress, Trauma, and Loss

Examines the psychology and behaviour of survivors, responders and leaders in situations of conflict, crisis, and disaster. Analyzes theory and evidence-informed practices that promote individual and collective resilience and recovery. Explores stress, trauma, grief and coping. Analyzes interventions that address the psychosocial needs of individuals and communities. Pre-requisites: One of CAMN502, DEMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS643: Ethno-political Conflicts in the Canadian Context

Addresses the nature of and approaches to response to, community conflicts in the Canadian context, with a specific focus on ethno-political forms of conflict. Compares the manifestation of ethno-political conflict in international and domestic contexts. Pre-requisites: One of DEMN502, CAMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS651: Case Studies in Humanitarian Action: Advanced Policy and Practice

Examines special topics in humanitarian policy and practice through comparative case study and discussion with experts in the field. Topics may vary from year to year, and will draw from current and anticipated issues of concern in a range of humanitarian contexts. Focuses on the connections between humanitarian principles and operations and their longer term development and sustainability consequences, placing particular emphasis on extracting lessons learned from recent cases. Examples may include protracted conflicts, political dimensions of humanitarian funding and action, population movements, homelessness, transition from the humanitarian stage to the development phase, and the efficacy of cross-cutting programming initiatives (e.g., gender, vulnerability). Pre-requisites: One of CAMN502, DEMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS652: Adaptive Management to Complex Humanitarian Problems in the 21st Century

Examines leadership theory, research, and practices that support resilience and adaptive planning, addressing concerns related to ill-structured, complex, and inter-related problems, and working in a range of threat environments and contexts (e.g., terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, cascading disasters, and complex emergencies). Pre-requisites: One of CAMN502, DEMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS653: Environmental and Resource-Based Conflict Management

Explores the nature and impacts of conflicts related to environmental and resource management issues in domestic and international contexts. Examines diversity of perspectives and mandates of stakeholders associated with these types of conflicts, and explores strategies for engaging with these issues to support sustainable development and protect basic human rights. Pre-requisites: One of DEMN502, CAMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS661: Risk and Crisis Communication

Examines communication needs associated with contexts of heightened concern (e.g., crisis, conflict, disasters). Analyzes theories about perception of risk. Explores theories, principles and practices of risk and crisis communication that support individuals, organizations and communities making effective risk/benefit decisions, managing fear and uncertainty, and responding to crisis. Pre-requisites: One of DEMN502, CAMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

HUMS662: Professional Practice in Conflict and Change Management

Develops core skills for professionals working in conflict and change management contexts: reflective practice, use of self, skills, process, and context of application. Examines design and implementation of sustainable and integrative changes at organisational and community levels, as well as in complex multi-stakeholder environments. Builds professional competencies for dealing with resistance and generating buy-in and ownership in change processes. (Blended course with a one week residency.) Pre-requisites: One of DEMN502, CAMN502, HSPB500, JUST502.
Course Credits: 3.00

IDSN521: Graphic Design for Instructional Designers

Examines the links between graphic design principles and the planning, design, and creation of effective learning materials in print, online or blended environments. Explores basic principles of graphic design, including layout, typography, and colour theory. Examines the key learning theories underpinning the connections between graphic treatment and learner engagement and cognition.
Course Credits: 3.00

IHMN505: Trends and Issues in Hospitality Management

Examines community, corporate and social responsibility as it pertains to hotel and resort management. The impact of accommodation on destinations, their competitive position, and the manager’s responsibility for sustainable business development will be examined domestically and internationally.
Course Credits: 3.00

IHMN650: Strategic Planning for Tourism

Developing corporate strategy requires focus on the entire organization and the competitive forces influencing the industry at large. Formulating, implementing, and evaluating corporate and business strategies, while balancing social responsibility and competitive positioning will be examined within the context of the hospitality industry.
Course Credits: 3.00

IICS560: Global Communication

Examines communication between divergent cultural value systems, across ethnic, racial, social, economic, and cultural barriers and how differing levels of technological adaptation and unequal power configurations affect intercultural and international communication. Considers the relation between information technology and the growth of global media systems and multinational corporations. Students analyze the role and significance of the rapid growth of multinational communication industries in shaping the modern world, with particular emphasis on the relationship between technology and the structures of power and control.
Course Credits: 3.00

IICS565: Media Relations in a Global Context

Explores and analyses media relations and how globalization and glocalization, have impacted the media industry. Introduces students to media relations strategies and tactics (including broadcast, print, and social media), as well as media cultures, comparative mass media systems, freedom of the press, cultural norms, and ethics and issues such as paying journalists as well as aspects of media law, and media policy. *pending approval
Course Credits: 3.00

IICS570: Public Affairs and Advocacy

Introduces students to the role that lobbying and advocacy play in influencing governmental decision making. Explores both the theories and practice of lobbying with a focus on strategies and activities of effective public affairs and advocacy campaigns. This course will provide both a clear understanding of the key government stakeholders and their role in policy decisions and the evolving frameworks that regulate a lobbyist’s activities. Conducted through lectures, case studies, and applied activities such as developing a public affairs and advocacy plan. *Pending approval.
Course Credits: 3.00

IICS672: International Relations and Public Diplomacy

Introduces students to the major theories and concepts of international relations and public diplomacy. Examines the main structures, processes, and raises awareness of different international issues and problems of both historical and contemporary significance. Examines the impact of globalization and social change.
Course Credits: 3.00

LEAD516: Concepts and Theories of Leadership in Organizations

Provides an in-depth and meaningful examination of the complex and evolving conceptions of leadership. Examines major leadership theories in current literature to critically reflect on and understand challenges that face today’s leaders. Critical reflection on leadership literature and students’ own conceptions and experience of leadership will ground students’ studies throughout the program.
Course Credits: 3.00

LRNT504: Instructional Design for Technology-Mediated Learning

Builds on concepts introduced in LRNT 501. Enables students to examine how learning theory influences instructional design from a variety of perspectives: content presentation, learning activities, and assessment. Introduces a broad range of instructional design models and allows students to evaluate the merits and suitability of each within specific learning contexts.
Course Credits: 3.00

LRNT505: Community Building Processes for Online Learning Environments

Connects underlying theories of learning with the practice of facilitating online learning and how this can be applied to build online learning communities. Develops and enhances online facilitation skills using leading trends and best practices.
Course Credits: 3.00
Programs(s): General Studies

LRNT507: Supporting Learners in Technology-Mediated Environments

Introduces the range of student service options, theories and models required in technology-mediated learning environments and the challenges involved in their provision. Learners will examine support levels in an actual organization and consider the evolving nature of support for the 21st century learner.
Course Credits: 3.00
Programs(s): General Studies

LRNT509: Choosing and Using Learning Technology

Enables students to categorize the various instructional media and both synchronous and asynchronous learning technology formats in current use and critically assess their characteristics. Encourages students to explore the pedagogical rationale for selecting appropriate technology for particular instructional contexts and to evaluate the effect that factors such as cost and available infrastructure have on successful implementation. Gives hands-on experience to help students determine ease of use and to estimate the potential training needs of their faculty and students.
Course Credits: 3.00
Programs(s): General Studies

LRNT510: International and Global Distance Education

Using a series of case studies, participants will first explore the role played by the leading international distance education organizations and institutions. They will then narrow their focus to examine the way individual countries or regions have implemented distance or blended programs, the policy issues, and the importance of partnerships. Finally, they will consider the implications of moving into the global delivery of distance education.
Course Credits: 3.00
Programs(s): General Studies

LRNT513: Leadership, Learning and Technology

Provides a basic foundation in leadership theories and explores the evolving interrelationships amongst leadership, learning and technology. Students develop critical thinking skills in choosing and developing leadership approaches for different sectors and contexts, and personalize their learning to fit with their interests, settings and goals.
Course Credits: 3.00
Programs(s): General Studies

MGMT562: International Business Strategy

Examines new and old mental models to foster a strategist perspective in international business practitioners. Students will explore and think critically about the core strategic international business notions, concepts, tools, models and economic trade theories required by managers to manage and lead their organizations in today’s challenging and turbulent international business ecosystem. Co-requisites: MGMT 561,568, 541A.
Course Credits: 3.00

MGMT566: Sustainability and International Corporate Citizenship

Integrates the consideration of human rights and environmental stewardship into assessments of business practices, to determine the “triple bottom line”: the economic, social and environmental impacts of global business. International Corporate Citizenship explores the use of voluntary codes of practice and market-driven certification programs that extend producer responsibility.
Course Credits: 3.00

PCOM540: Communication, Culture, and Media

Presents an overview of the historical development of theories and approaches to cultural studies, especially as they interconnect with communication studies. Considers the meaning and production of culture, the culture industry, and various interpretive practices and how mass media has influenced and been influenced by cultural industries.
Course Credits: 3.00

PCOM633: Strategic Communication Management

Explores effective management of external communication programs in a business context. Reference is made to the linkages between all major communication efforts, including marketing and advertising; however the emphasis of the course is on public relations, stakeholder relations, and corporate communication. The course focuses on the requisite skill set of corporate communication managers, including reputation management, crisis management and strategic communication planning. Current trends, such as the use of social media, are highlighted. The course is delivered through a combination of case studies, in-class exercises and lectures designed to provide an opportunity for applying learnings through realistic scenarios and role playing.
Course Credits: 3.00

PCOM640: Communication Policy, Politics and Law

Takes as its premise the political and ideological nature of communication, media and culture. Surveys classic and contemporary sources, themes and debates in the academic communication literature as these relate to disciplinary subfields such as policy, political economy, political communication, technology studies, cultural economics, law and ethics, and as they manifest in the interpersonal, print, broadcast, and telecommunications realms. Learners explore topics ranging from trans-national and state-level concerns to civil society; from electoral politics to those of social movements and countercultures; and from major policy documents and regulatory bodies in Canada and abroad to issues like terrorism and propaganda, privacy and surveillance, digital media and intellectual property that test the capacity of policymakers.
Course Credits: 3.00

PJMN501: Managing Complex Projects

Project managers use specific proven techniques and strategies for achieving outstanding results. Several models have evolved to provide contextual frameworks for integrating projects within an organization’s strategic goals. This course includes and examines the benefits realization approach and the SMART (strategically managed, aligned, regenerative and transitional) model.
Course Credits: 3.00

TRMN503: Transforming Destinations

Social, economic, infrastructure, stakeholder and political aspects of a community and region are investigated relative to the interest in creating sustainable tourism destination. The role and importance of consensus-building processes; theming and visioning; community capacity and land use planning; and destination marketing organization (DMO) development will be reviewed as integral elements for success.
Course Credits: 3.00

TRMN504: Product & Market Innovations

Tourism products and markets are analyzed through the lens of the customer experience, niche markets, and the role of physical and emotional experiences in creating a competitive advantage. Traditional paradigms for product and market development are probed; the value of emotions in attracting and retaining visitors debated; criterion for success evaluated, and performance measures examined.
Course Credits: 3.00

TRMN505: Strategic Tourism Marketing

Examines the current and pragmatic aspects of the strategic marketing of tourism with an emphasis on new internet-based opportunities and challenges for businesses and destinations. The impact of experiential vs. traditional marketing methods is analysed. Customer profiling and traditional and e-distribution channels are investigated including images, messages and with a lens to optimize limited resources. Students will challenge current assumptions and reflect on their own practice and experience as they make decisions on how to effectively connect with tourism products, destinations, and evolving customer expectations.
Course Credits: 3.00

TRMN506: Sustainable Tourism Management

Identifies and evaluates best practices in context, processes, skills and resources used in sustainable tourism. Policy, planning, regulations and implementation from government, business and community perspectives are analyzed. Dynamic issues such as global climate change, green tourism planning, environmental impacts of tourism, sustainability goals, performance measurement, capacity building, and funding will be examined and debated through case studies.
Course Credits: 3.00

TRMN507: Ethics in Tourism and Hospitality

Essential stewardship issues of personal and corporate responsibility in a global context are analyzed. Environmental and social stewardship within a global economy for tourism operators, destinations, First Nations protocols and community stakeholders are evaluated. Moral perspectives are debated relative to decision-making, negotiation, and responsible tourism development.
Course Credits: 3.00

TRMN625: Social Entrepreneurship

Creating and leading organizations, social entrepreneurs strive to advance social and environmental change through innovative business practices. Learners examine how this global phenomenon exists within the non-profit, public and private sectors. Processes of social entrepreneurship assessed in this course include: recognizing opportunities; evaluating feasibility; building effective business models; mobilizing resources; scaling impact and building sustainability. Through case studies and assignments, learners evaluate common strategies and pitfalls encountered when creating stable, sustainable, and successful social ventures in the tourism and hospitality industry.
Course Credits: 3.00