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GBLD501: Personal and Theoretical Foundations to Global Leadership

Critically explores key concepts of global leadership through personal, collective, and theoretical lenses to prepare students for the MAGL program. This includes learning about one’s own cultural ‘lenses’, mental models and the historical structural inequalities, and coming to a broader understanding and integration of approaches to working in a global context. Participants will explore and describe their personal and collective values and goals, establish personal and collective learning plans, and prepare life and self for residency. During this course, a strong emphasis will be placed on building a supportive learning community, thus creating a strong foundation for the program.
Course Credits: 3.0

GBLD505: Personal Capacities for Working in Complex Global Systems

Focuses on building personal capacities in a global setting by developing self-awareness and self-management skills in regard to each individual’s values, beliefs, practices, and assumptions. Students will engage in building understanding and communication skills that support authentic and collaborative relationships with others who have different values, beliefs, and behaviours. Students will explore and describe their own orientation to the world so as to enhance adaptability and resiliency in complex, changing environments. Students will learn the fundamentals of global leadership in complex environments. Students will learn to apply systems approaches to understanding complex organizational and societal systems, adopting different ways of knowing and considering political, social, cultural and spiritual perspectives. Students will explore dynamics of power across generational, gender and class divides and learn how to tap into the creative potentials of diversity, conflict, change and complexity. Pre-requisite: GBLD501 or with permission.
Course Credits: 9.0

ITAI: Introduction to Academic Integrity

The Introduction to Academic Integrity course illustrates academic integrity and plagiarism in real-life scenarios. A clear sense of academic honesty and responsibility is fundamental to good scholarship, and the integrity of university academic work and the degrees conferred by the university is dependent upon the honesty and soundness of the teacher-student learning relationship and of the evaluation process. Therefore, all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism, and other academic offences. The Introduction to Academic Integrity course serves as a helpful, interactive companion to the academic integrity policy and procedures outlined in the Student Policies & Procedures, which contains the policies and procedures that guide academic life at Royal Roads and support our mission as a university.
Course Credits: 0.0