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JUST300: Human Service Skills in the Justice Field

Introduces different concepts of justice as viewed through philosophy, law, social work and social science perspectives. These will be developed throughout the Justice Studies Program. Students are introduced to communication, leadership, basic negotiating, mediation, ethical conduct, interview and presentation skills. Students identify and address inter-group conflict and on-the-job life skills, such as introducing workplace health strategies and basic project management. Includes theoretical instruction and practical exercises based on scenarios in the justice field.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST301: Canadian Criminal Justice System: Part 1

Looks at the phenomenon of and the response to crime in Canadian society. Examines crime in Canada as compared with other countries, and criminological theories and their applicability. Students examine traditional and new judicial approaches (restorative justice) and the role of the police, Crown, courts, sentencing, and the organization of criminal and quasi-criminal law in Canada. Explores the role of the victim within the Canadian Justice System and the special status of young offenders.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST303: History and Philosophy of Justice in the Canadian Context until 1867

Introduces important philosophical thought and concepts of justice in the Western tradition. Examines the historical evolution of justice in Canada and how it has been influenced by philosophy. Students analyze how the normative appeal of justice can be understood in different ways. Special emphasis is placed on the present Canadian context, including the roles of liberalism, multiculturalism and Indigenous concepts of justice.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST304: Canadian Constitution

Focuses on the constitutional framework of Canadian society with special emphasis on justice topics, including Canadian federalism, Charter rights, the mechanisms of the Oakes test and the theory and practice of Aboriginal self-government. Explores the impact of the Charter on justice service workers. Includes extensive use of case studies to acquaint students with the concept of balancing interests within the Canadian justice discourse.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST306: Canadian Criminal Justice System: Part 2

Looks at the phenomenon of and the response to crime in Canadian society. Examines crime in Canada as compared with other countries, and criminological theories and their applicability. Students examine traditional and new judicial approaches (restorative justice) and the role of the police, Crown, courts, sentencing, and the organization of criminal and quasi-criminal law in Canada. Explores the role of the victim within the Canadian Justice System and the special status of young offenders. Pre-requisites: JUST301
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST308: Family and Justice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Explores the pivotal role of the family in society, including the legal position of individuals within the family. Includes the evolution of theories and public policies relating to marriage, divorce, parental responsibilities, child and spousal support, child development, child maltreatment, and family violence. Also examines alternative dispute resolution mechanisms and court processes. Students evaluate the impact of public and social policy on families.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST312: Indigenous Justice Perspectives

Explores Indigenous world views to justice. Encourages dialogue regarding historical impacts of colonial justice on Indigenous peoples within Canada and responses to the recognized problems with dominant approaches to justice. Includes an examination of historical responses and current measures to redress injustices and contemporary advances in Indigenous justice perspectives.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST315: Civil and Administrative Law and Regulatory Environments

Examines the structure of civil law as it relates to contract, tort and administrative law. Draws on case studies in private and public sectors to examine issues such as labour relations, equity, harassment and privacy. Introduces students to the structure and function of administrative tribunals. *pending approval
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST400A: Theory and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Explores the theoretical components of conflict resolution and the rationales behind various alternative dispute resolution practices. Focuses on conflict analyses and contexts for alternative dispute resolution applications. Prerequisites: JUST 300. *pending approval
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST400B: Alternative Dispute Resolution in Practice

Introduces students to the skills needed for alternative dispute resolution practice. Includes exploration of communication, intercultural competencies and processes for negotiation, facilitation, mediation, arbitration and restorative justice. Students have the option of completing additional training for future mediation certification through formal mediation agencies. Prerequisites: JUST 300. *pending approval
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST401: History and Philosophy of Law in the Canadian Context from 1867

Introduces the student to important philosophical thought and concepts of justice in the Western tradition. The course examines the historical evolution of law in Canada and how it has been influenced by philosophy. JUST 401 examines philosophical thinking regarding society, politics, law and justice and historical phenomena after 1867. Special emphasis is on the present Canadian context that is liberalism, multiculturalism and Aboriginal concepts of justice. Pre-requisites: JUST303
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST402: Public Policy and Justice

Examines how public and social policy affects the mandate and activities of agencies. Appraises public and social policy in the justice field and analyzes the underlying philosophy and the interests being served by specific public and social policy. Compares these interests to a broader Canadian justice context. Pre-requisites: JUST400
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST403: Comparative Global Legal Approaches and Philosophies

Focuses on the fundamental characteristics of other legal systems in the world. Explores the Canadian legal system in the context of European and non-Western systems highlighting important philosophical and cultural approaches. Examines important Indigenous self-government models in other countries.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST404: Introduction to International Law and International Organizations

Provides an overview of the working principles of, and the philosophy underlying, international law and international organizations. Examines key international treaties and their impact on Canadian justice. Focuses on methods of international dispute resolution. Considers the impact of globalization on recent developments in international law and international organizations.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST408: Exercises in Ethics and Law

Uses case studies in the justice field to train students in arriving at ethical decision-making within the value context of Canadian society.
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST410: Research Methods for Justice Practitioners

Prepares students to interpret, critique, plan, and conduct basic and applied research in the justice context. Specifically, course considerations include a fundamental understanding of the types and purposes of research, the logic involved in the scientific method, research design, and the interplay between theory and selection of research method. Students are exposed to qualitative methods, including interviews and focus groups, and quantitative methods, including experimental design, survey research and secondary analysis. Fundamental aspects of data analysis for both research paradigms will be provided. Pre-requisites: JUST400
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST411: Justice Practicum

Assesses justice services practice in light of the theoretical knowledge and practical skills gained throughout the Justice Studies program. Students work with an organization to develop justice related skills and to apply relevant theories in the practice context. Includes a practicum and career management preparation module and reflective and critical evaluation of practice. Prerequisites: completion of all previous courses in program. *pending approval
Course Credits: 6.0

JUST412: Applied Research Project

Students chose from two streams to complete an individual applied research project. Stream one requires students to identify a justice agency willing to support their investigation into a justice-related topic. Stream two provides students the opportunity to work with an instructor on a justice-related topic from more theoretical and academic perspectives. Students work independently to produce a relevant paper that will inform justice theory or practice. Prerequisites: completion of all other previous courses in program. *pending approval
Course Credits: 6.0

JUST416: Gender Diversity and Justice

Analyses justice from the perspectives of those ignored or otherwise marginalised by current approaches to legal and justice and systems, including women, LGBQT, racial groups and persons with disabilities. Utilises case studies to examine the argument that dominant legal and justice structures are not designed with the realities underpinning gender and diversity in contemporary society. *pending approval
Course Credits: 3.0

JUST419: Critical Analysis of Justice Perspectives

Introduces logical argumentation in the justice context. Examines the evolution of different schools of thought and their adaptation to the Canadian legal and justice discourses. Depending on the instructor and current justice issues, perspectives may include liberalism, conservatism, globalization, critical perspectives, environmentalism, structuralism, post structuralism and post modernism. *pending approval
Course Credits: 3.0

JUSTSB: Skills Building Career Preparation for Justice Studies

Focuses on preparing students for the internship experience of JUST409. Provides students with career management skills through three phases of introspection, reflection and action related to career planning. During the course, students will complete assignments, activities and participate in discussions related to: exploring strengths and preferences, researching industry, preparing resumes and cover letters, creating an online presence, networking, interviewing, negotiating skills and more.
Course Credits: 0.0