Core Courses

The core courses listed below are a combination of those that students take in the BA in Interdisciplinary Studies (BAIS) program and those in the BA in Interdisciplinary Studies Leadership for Sustainability specialization (BAIS Specialization). Students in the BAIS program will take INDS300, INDS310, IND417, INDS480 and INDS490 combined with courses listed on the curriculum page. Students in the BAIS Specialization will take all the courses listed below in their entirety.

COMM440: Organizational Communication

Considers the communication issues of deliberate, purposeful organizations: those intentionally created and maintained to achieve particular outcomes. This approach will be relevant to understanding organizations in the public, private and non-profit sectors and examples will be used from all three sectors. There will be an emphasis upon the culture and strategy of leadership and governance. Provides a fuller, richer understanding of what organizations are, how they work and how, through your communication practices, to successfully contribute to sustaining or changing the organizations in your own life.
Credits: 3.0

ENMN429: Environmental and Corporate Social Responsibility

Focuses on the “triple bottom-line” (planet, people and profits) this course integrates the related fields of business ethics, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. The ability to meet stakeholder needs whilst simultaneously contributing to society in a positive way is discussed. Pre-requisites: ENMN300, ENMN325. Co-requisites: ENMN499
Credits: 3.0

ENSC423: Environmental Economics

Economics is usually described as the analysis of the rational development and use of scarce resources. Students learn the principles of efficient allocations of all resources regardless of how well markets ration this development and use. Examines the pervasiveness of market failures for environmental goods and the effectiveness of different techniques and policies attempting to correct these failures or to mitigate their negative consequences. Illustrating examples are chosen as much as possible from the experience of British Columbia and other regions of Canada.
Credits: 3.0

ENVM322: Sustainability from Theory to Reality

Explores the three imperatives model of sustainable development beginning with a historical exploration of the concept. From there, course moves to practical applications designed to develop an understanding of how the three imperatives of ecological, economic, and social sustainability interact. INSTRUCTORS: Dr.
Credits: 3.0

ENVM427: Public Policy Formulation

Examines how government policy is generated, what purpose it serves, and some of the instruments used in its application.
Credits: 3.0

ENVP303: Statistical Literacy and Critical Thinking

Focuses on how data can be transformed into reliable information. Statistical tests are employed using first principles, real examples, and the technology commonly employed by environmental scientists and managers. Learners are introduced to statistical concepts and techniques through relevant examples and expected to demonstrate their understanding of statistics through the appropriate application of technology to real data and group discussions.
Credits: 3.0

ENVP322: Sustainable Development: Ideas and Applications

Examine some of the theory of sustainable development, and explore the links between these theories. This is accompanied by the development and analysis of case studies describing ways that practical sustainable development options can be implemented, and discussion of alternative approaches to sustainability.
Credits: 3.0

ENVP429: Ethics and Environment

Explores some of the key ethical issues concerning humanity’s relationship to the environment. Dominant themes include deciding what has value, criteria for making good decisions, and moral principles for human behaviour toward the environment. Become familiar with a range of perspectives and positions commonly found in Western environmental debates as well as alternative ways to consider the issues. Emphasis is kept on how theory relates to the practice of environmental ethics. Cultivate the skills necessary to analyze arguments, assess lines of reasoning, and learn to articulate clearly and defend one’s own ethics.
Credits: 3.0

INDS300: Writing Across Disciplines

Explores the nature, style, and form of writing in various disciplines. Provides instruction in writing for academic and professional fields of practice. Introduces basic principles of rhetoric, argumentation, and collaboration. Fosters critical reading skills. Co-requisite: INDS310
Credits: 3.0

INDS310: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies

Introduces students to academic disciplines and professional fields of practice, leading into a thorough understanding of interdisciplinarity, multidisciplinarity, and transdisciplinarity. Explores benefits and challenges of integrating knowledge across disciplines. Co-requisites: INDS300
Credits: 3.0

INDS311: Leadership for Sustainability

Course description not available
Credits: n/a

INDS400: Global Perspective on Indigenous Ways of Knowing

Brings Indigenous perspectives to the analysis of contemporary global problems that affect the environment and humanity. Critiques definitions of progress. Studies the implications of contemporary industrial and consumer culture for the future of human societies within the framework of the insights, values, and definitions of community offered by Indigenous peoples worldwide. Examines the potential relevance of Indigenous bodies of knowledge and wisdom to the search for solutions to contemporary environmental problems and survival issues is examined.
Credits: 3.0

INDS417: Independent Study

Directed study of academic and professional literature in the student’s area of concentration. Guided by a Royal Roads faculty member. Enables a student to engage with a specific area of scholarship arising from their overall program of study.
Credits: 3.0

INDS480: Internship

Guides students in applying theoretical knowledge and professional skills in a supervised, professional, domestic or international context relevant to their program of study. Brings classroom learning, theoretical concepts and academic literature together with practical learning, insights from the field of practice and application of skills. Students must secure internship placement on their own. Pre-requisites: INDS 300 and INDS 310 RRU Career Management Skills Training offered through the Office of Work Integrated Learning
Credits: 9.0

INDS490: Senior Research Project/Paper

Individual research paper or project serving as capstone experience for program. Should reflect basic understanding of qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. May consist of primary or secondary research. Optimum length is 15 to 20 pages (4,000 to 5,000 words). Constitutes approximately 200 hours of student effort.
Credits: 6.0

ITAI: Introduction to Academic Integrity

Course description not available
Credits: n/a